27 Oct, 2017

Less Is Sometimes More - From Stuff to Happiness

by Barbara Simon

It seems to be a bit of a trend, people talking about downsizing – and not only the older ones who don’t share their homes with kids anymore -, about minimalistic life style, about selling up and let go of all that ties us down. Yes we are a consumer society where we seem to love spending a lot of money and time and energy for things we don’t really need, want or find helpful, but we do it because others do it and we are being told we have to because it might just make us happy.

Yet many have now understood that it is not the materialistic things we buy that make us happy – often quite the opposite – but it is more experiences, emotions, adventures, shared moments that contribute much more to our happiness and wellbeing.

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14 Aug, 2017

Just For One Week...

by Barbara Simon

Scientific studies show that we have around 60000 thoughts every day. Only 3% of those thoughts are positive, 97% are – not so positive. Why is that so? Seems we are prisoners of our own brains.

In an analysis conducted by A. Heimsroth, a german Psychotherapist, it was evident that when we write down our thoughts there is only a very small portion of positives we write down. E.g. we would say “it wasn’t bad” instead of saying “it was good”. Thoughts and psycho hygiene are important for our emotional and physical stability and health as thoughts create our reality. They determine our actions, out actions determine our behaviour and our behaviours shape our life. And when we stay in our rather negative thoughts and dealings we have a negative influence on our surroundings. When we learn to control our thoughts and turn them into positive ones more often we can experience that we will develop more joy, self-esteem and in the end self love. Negative thoughts will hinder us from achieving and will keep us in believing that we are not worthy, not able and will block any positive development.

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14 Aug, 2017

3 Myths About Self Esteem

by Barbara Simon

Self esteem is something a lot of people are lacking, some have in abundance and most of us want it – and more of it. The thing is there are a few myths surrounding self esteem which people might use as an excuse not to get better at self esteem and instead keep sitting in the same little hole feeling sorry for themselves…… Sorry to be so blunt but that is often the case. Therefor I have decided to dispel the myths and let you know THERE IS HOPE!!!

Myth #1: Self esteem is something you are born with. Not true. Well, to a degree it might be true but it doesn’t mean an either or. If you are born with it, great. I am sure it can always be improved though. If you weren’t born with it, you can actually develop it. Learn it. Practice it and become better and better at it. No matter how far you want to take it

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21 Jul, 2017

A new approach to dealing with stress

by Barbara Simon

If you type the word “stress” into a search engine you will get a variety of explanations and definitions but in the end we all know that stress can lead to physical and emotional ill health if not dealt with regularly. The definition I liked the most is the following:
 
Stress is the feeling we have when under pressure, while stressors are the things we respond to in our environment. Examples of stressors are noises, unpleasant people, a speeding car, or even going out on a first date. Generally (but not always), the more stressors we experience, the more stressed we feel.”
 
Why? Because it actually mentions the importance of stressors and not only the state of being stressed. In the end it is not the stress itself we have to look at but the stressor and more so the way we respond to that stressor. Let’s take the speeding or slow car as an example. Why can some people ignore that stressor completely while it drives others mad and to actions they can’t even explain themselves where they came from – like yelling and cursing as if the driver would hear it…. And here begins the work dealing with stress by looking at the stressor. We have an emotional memory experience that lets us respond the way we respond and which is triggered from our unconscious mind. Within that unconscious mind we have stored a variety of emotions which might have protected us in a certain situation once but for some reason our brain now thinks, it has to protect us again and again when a similar situation appears. That memory emotion is stuck and can create stress as it lets us react in a way we actually don’t really want to react but can’t help it. Welcome to the world of unconsciousness.
 
The way to approach this “emotional stuckness” is by using a technique called wingwave-coaching which is a combination of EMDR (eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing), NLP (Neuro Linguistic Programming) and muscle testing as a way to find the exact emotion to work with.
 
Wingwave coaching is new to Australia, coming all the way from Germany and it is now available at Mona Vale Health Space, provided by Barbara Simon, the Results-Coach at the clinic. For the month of July, Barbara is offering a 50% off the first visit so you can experience a different approach to reducing your stress levels.
 
Btw, stress is very often linked to fear and fear is one of the emotions mostly worked with in wingwave coaching. Like fear of heights, fear of flying, fear of spiders, fear of public speaking. And all of those fears create stress, don’t they….. It all comes together in the end J
 
To book in with Barbara please call 9979 8887 or for more information call Barbara directly on 0452180759

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29 Jun, 2017

A new approach to dealing with stress

by Barbara Simon

If you type the word “stress” into a search engine you will get a variety of explanations and definitions but in the end we all know that stress can lead to physical and emotional ill health if not dealt with regularly. The definition I liked the most is the following:

Stress is the feeling we have when under pressure, while stressors are the things we respond to in our environment. Examples of stressors are noises, unpleasant people, a speeding car, or even going out on a first date. Generally (but not always), the more stressors we experience, the more stressed we feel.”

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