04 May, 2018

Brain or Spine?

by Lydia Feng

Chronic low back pain (CLBP) has been found to be one of the most common and crucial clinical, economic, and public health problems when looking at chronic pain disorders worldwide (1). It is widely regarded as a multifactorial disorder which can be complicated to treat.  Current treatment strategies for people with CLBP are often based on a biomechanical (e.g. treatment of involved joints, muscles, ligaments) or pharmacological model (e.g. NSAIDS, painkillers) without addressing the underlying pain mechanism. Research shows that there are brain changes in CLPB and understanding these changes can help improve care for not only the pain symptoms but also side effects of CLBP such as poor sleep and fear avoidance behaviour(2).

What are the brain changes?

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16 Feb, 2018

Conquer Your Cycle – Part Three

by Lydia Feng

Prepping for Period

Leading up to your period, your body undergoes a couple of changes which may results in what’s known as Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) which let’s be honest, no one needs in their life. Here are some explanations as to what is going on and what you can do about it:

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15 Feb, 2018

Conquer Your Cycle – Part One.

by Lydia Feng

Menstrual cycles are one of those things in life that most women have a bit of love-hate relationship with. From food cravings to low energy to abdominal cramps, sometimes it can feel like your reproductive system is plotting against you, but it really isn’t! By having a good understanding of your cycle and taking control of it, you can make the most of your month and the helpful hormones your body produces.

The Fit Follicular Phase

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15 Feb, 2018

Conquer Your Cycle – Part Two

by Lydia Feng

The Luteal phase is the second half of your cycle starting with ovulation (Day 13-14*) and ending either with pregnancy or just before your period starts (Day 28*). During this phase, the follicle becomes the copurs luteum and secretes high amounts of progesterone.  Progesterone is a key hormone for prepping the uterus for pregnancy, making the lining nice and comfortable for the egg to attach. It also does the opposite of estrogen and can make the body more insulin resistant. It is advised during this period to be a bit more careful with starchy food.  This is a good time to load up on magnesium and zinc rich foods as well as minerals and essential fatty acids. Your body will be craving sugar so aim to eat more complex carbs to keep your energy up instead of reaching for that chocolate bar!

Research has shown that strenuous and endurance type exercises may induce an inflammatory response from the body leading up to your period so it’s best to take it easy during your luteal phase. Participate in some more laidback exercises such as walking, stretching and yoga. If high intensity is your cup of tea, try to shorten the session and finish off with some good stretches.

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