27 Apr, 2017

Hip flexor Tendinopathy

by Eleni Tsagaris

The Psoas major muscle - a major hip flexor - attaches deep inside the front of the hip joint to the lesser trochanter (a bony prominence on the front of the femur). Psoas tendinopathy is the inflammation and partial tearing of the muscle’s tendinous attachment, which occurs when the tendon becomes irritated.

 Hip flexor tendinopathy can be caused by:

·      Sport or work activities leading to overuse or injury to the hip joint area e.g. running, stair climbing.

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22 Feb, 2017

Shoulder injuries and rehabilitation

by Eleni Tsagaris

The shoulder complex is a ball and socket joint formed where the head of the humerus  meets the glenoid of the scapula. Also involved in the shoulder complex is the acromioclavicular joint (where the acromion meets the clavicle) the acromion and the coracoid process.

There are several other important structures involved, these include:

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01 Feb, 2017

What Are Impingements?

by Eleni Tsagaris

Shoulder impingement is caused by the intermittent trapping and compression of rotator cuff tendons in the small space under the top of the shoulder - the subacromial space. Shoulder impingement is a syndrome, occurring due to repeated shoulder movement and therefore frequent compression of the rotator cuff tendons. This leads to inflammation, swelling, and thus, a persistent ache or pain.

What causes impingement?

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11 Jan, 2017

But, I don’t have time to stretch!

by Eleni Tsagaris

How many of you jump straight out of a workout – whether it be a spin class, weights session or run on the treadmill – without taking the time to adequately cool down or stretch?

As a Physiotherapist at Health Space, I see many clients presenting with acute sport or exercise related injuries, resulting in pain and several weeks of rehabilitation. It is more common than not, that these injuries are either due to a poor technique or complete failure to stretch.

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11 Jan, 2017

Scoli-what?

by Eleni Tsagaris

Scoliosis is the term used to describe an abnormal sidewards curvature in the spine.

When viewed from the back, the spine should appear straight from the top of the neck to the bottom of the tail bone. However, when a scoliosis occurs, the spine can appear in one of three ways:

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27 Jun, 2016

But I have a six-pack, doesn’t that mean I have a good core?

by Eleni Tsagaris

Core Stability has become a recently fashionable term however, it is evident that many people do not have a true understanding of what core stability actually involves. Contrary to what you may think, having ‘6-pack’ abs does not necessarily guarantee that you have a strong and functional core!

The core musculature is comprised of all the muscles in the lumbopelvic and thoracic regions that work to initiate and control movements of your spine. These muscles are not only those ‘outer core muscles’ visible on the abdominal wall, such as your external obliques and rectus abdominus – which work to generate movement and provide gross spinal stability - but also include the ‘inner core muscles,’ such as your transverse abdominus, diaphragm, multifidus and pelvic floor - which provide segmental spinal stability. These are the muscles that activate to truly support your spine and pelvis, in order to prevent back pain or other injuries when making potentially uncontrolled movements.

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