20 Nov, 2017

Climbers Elbow (What's that?!)

by Eleni Tsagaris

Climbers Elbow is characterised by pain in the upper arm or front of the elbow due to inflammation and strain of the brachialis muscle. Brachialis acts to assist the biceps in flexing the forearm at the elbow joint.

Symptoms:

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31 Oct, 2017

I tore my MCL! What does that mean?

by Eleni Tsagaris

I tore my MCL!

The Medial Collateral Ligament is one of the four crucial ligaments that support and stabilise the knee joint. It runs vertically on the inside (medial aspect) of the knee , connecting the end of the femur to the top of the tibia.

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24 Oct, 2017

Hip Impingement

by Eleni Tsagaris

Why does my hip get stuck?  By Eleni Tsagaris - Physiotherapist

Femoral Acetabular Impingement – what is it?

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13 Sep, 2017

Pain in the Neck

by Eleni Tsagaris

Neck pain, headaches and stiffness are all very common complaints that many clients present with here in the clinic. Mechanical neck pain occurs as a result of sustaining positions of poor posture, most commonly with forward head posture, leading to strain on the muscles, tendons, joints and discs of the spine. This is caused by many activities of daily living such as sitting at a desk, watching television or driving, thereby resulting in stiffness of joints of the cervical spine, protective muscle spasm and weakness. The longer these abnormal positions or postures are sustained, the harder it is to self correct the habits and musculoskeletal changes that have occurred, thereby resulting in irritation and strain on the delicate structures of your cervical spine. Various other conditions of the cervical spine such as whiplash, torticollis or arthritis, can also be caused by acute injury in sports activities or motor vehicle accidents.

If you are experiencing symptoms such as clicking/grating sounds originating from your neck, headaches, aches, stiffness, numbness/pins and needles into the arms or hands, upper back/shoulder pain or jaw pain, it is important that you are assessed by one of our trained Physiotherapists. Physiotherapy is highly recommended for the treatment, prevention and self-management of neck pain. A typical Physiotherapy consultation involves a thorough subjective and objective examination, as well as recommendation of a care plan tailored specific to the individual. Treatment may involve several of the following:

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07 Sep, 2017

Anatomy of the Radius

by Eleni Tsagaris

The radius is one of the two bones in your forearm that allows four different movements; flexion, extension, supination and pronation. It has a unique round articular surface, which meets with the humerus (of the upper arm) and ulna of the forearm at the elbow. This unique surface is what turns to enable your elbow to be able to do all these four movements. Here at the elbow, also attaches many tendons of the muscles of the arm and forearm.

10 weeks ago, I sustained a fracture to my neck of radius. After a trip to Emergency, I was put into a sling and sent home with strict Doctor’s orders to keep my arm immobilised for one week until follow up x-ray at the Hospital’s Fracture Clinic. One Week later, follow up x-ray revealed a clean, non-displaced fracture. As such, it was decided that my arm would not require casting (only immobilisation in a sling for another 2 weeks).

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27 Apr, 2017

Hip flexor Tendinopathy

by Eleni Tsagaris

The Psoas major muscle - a major hip flexor - attaches deep inside the front of the hip joint to the lesser trochanter (a bony prominence on the front of the femur). Psoas tendinopathy is the inflammation and partial tearing of the muscle’s tendinous attachment, which occurs when the tendon becomes irritated.

 Hip flexor tendinopathy can be caused by:

·      Sport or work activities leading to overuse or injury to the hip joint area e.g. running, stair climbing.

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22 Feb, 2017

Shoulder injuries and rehabilitation

by Eleni Tsagaris

The shoulder complex is a ball and socket joint formed where the head of the humerus  meets the glenoid of the scapula. Also involved in the shoulder complex is the acromioclavicular joint (where the acromion meets the clavicle) the acromion and the coracoid process.

There are several other important structures involved, these include:

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01 Feb, 2017

What Are Impingements?

by Eleni Tsagaris

Shoulder impingement is caused by the intermittent trapping and compression of rotator cuff tendons in the small space under the top of the shoulder - the subacromial space. Shoulder impingement is a syndrome, occurring due to repeated shoulder movement and therefore frequent compression of the rotator cuff tendons. This leads to inflammation, swelling, and thus, a persistent ache or pain.

What causes impingement?

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11 Jan, 2017

But, I don’t have time to stretch!

by Eleni Tsagaris

How many of you jump straight out of a workout – whether it be a spin class, weights session or run on the treadmill – without taking the time to adequately cool down or stretch?

As a Physiotherapist at Health Space, I see many clients presenting with acute sport or exercise related injuries, resulting in pain and several weeks of rehabilitation. It is more common than not, that these injuries are either due to a poor technique or complete failure to stretch.

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11 Jan, 2017

Scoli-what?

by Eleni Tsagaris

Scoliosis is the term used to describe an abnormal sidewards curvature in the spine.

When viewed from the back, the spine should appear straight from the top of the neck to the bottom of the tail bone. However, when a scoliosis occurs, the spine can appear in one of three ways:

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27 Jun, 2016

But I have a six-pack, doesn’t that mean I have a good core?

by Eleni Tsagaris

Core Stability has become a recently fashionable term however, it is evident that many people do not have a true understanding of what core stability actually involves. Contrary to what you may think, having ‘6-pack’ abs does not necessarily guarantee that you have a strong and functional core!

The core musculature is comprised of all the muscles in the lumbopelvic and thoracic regions that work to initiate and control movements of your spine. These muscles are not only those ‘outer core muscles’ visible on the abdominal wall, such as your external obliques and rectus abdominus – which work to generate movement and provide gross spinal stability - but also include the ‘inner core muscles,’ such as your transverse abdominus, diaphragm, multifidus and pelvic floor - which provide segmental spinal stability. These are the muscles that activate to truly support your spine and pelvis, in order to prevent back pain or other injuries when making potentially uncontrolled movements.

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